C-EC24-0050

24 x L'Heritage De Chasse Spleen 2015, 2nd label of Ch. Chasse Spleen, Half bottle

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This wine is currently ageing carefully in our cellar in France, in our temperature and humidity controlled facility. We now organise two monthly shipments from our French cellar to Singapore, providing more regular and consistent deliveries directly to your door. Please understand that you might observe a maximum delivery lead time of 3 weeks. Nonetheless, as customer experience is of the utmost importance to us, we'll try our best to minimise this delivery time. Do not hesitate to contact our customer service for more information if needed.

Case Size: 24 x 0.375. Has vanilla and cinnamon aromas on the nose. The attack is clear and direct. The palate offers black cherry and subtle toasty flavours with a voluminous mouthfeel. The finish ends with cherry notes and a long length.

  • VINTAGE: 2015

    GRAPE: Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot

    ORIGIN: France - Bordeaux

    TASTE PROFILE: Robust Red - Powerful & Bold

    DELICIOUS WITH: Beef, Lamb, Game, Poultry

    SERVING TEMPERATURE:16 to 18°C

    IDEAL FOR: Dinner, Romantic dinner, Special occasion, Impress

    SIZE: 0.375

    EXPERT RATINGS: 89 - Vivino

    THE STORY: Chateau Chasse Spleen was once part of a much larger Haut Medoc estate that sold their wine under the name of Chateau Grand-Poujeaux. In 1822, their Bordeaux vineyards were divided as follows; half the property became Chateau Gressier-Grand-Poujeaux and the other half of the estate eventually became the foundation for what would become 3 different, Bordeaux estates, Chateau Maucaillou, Chateau Poujeaux-Theil and of course, Chateau Chasse Spleen. There are numerous stories trying to explain the name of Chateau Chasse Spleen. The best possibilities are poetic. The first version is, the name was inspired from a visit by Lord Byron in 1821. During that visit, Bryon was so moved, he was quoted, “Quel remede pour chasser le spleen”, which when loosely translated means, “What remedy to remove the spleen?” The other equally poetic explanation is attributed to the poem Spleen, whose author Charles Baudelaire also visited Chateau Chasse Spleen. Chateau Chasse Spleen remained the property of the Castaing family until it was sold just before World War 1 to a German family of wine merchants. After the outbreak of World War I, Chateau Chasse Spleen was confiscated as enemy property and sold at an auction in 1922 to the Lahary family.

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